Why does my jaw joint lock so that I cannot get it open all the way?

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In previous posts, I discussed the common denominator of TMD (temporomandibular joint disorders) responsible for ALL of the wide and varied symptoms associated with this enigmatic problem.  Inflammation within the jaw joints causes each and every one of these divergent and seemingly unrelated symptoms.

One of the most frequent symptoms of TMD is a condition that most patients report as an inability of open their mouth fully.  In some cases, the inability to open occurs gradually and the patient is not aware that there is any limitation to the amount of opening.  In most cases, the patient is critically aware that there is a problem because, all of a sudden, they cannot open their mouth completely.  Frequently this is associated with acute pain and sometimes a loud “snap” is heard, but most of the time it is just an instantaneous inability to open fully and any attempt to open beyond a certain point will elicit extreme pain.  Sometimes this limitation of opening will clear just as suddenly and it appeared, and sometimes it does not, and it is “permanently” locked with the patient unable to open beyond the half way point.  Some patients are extremely troubled by these events and immediately go to their local hospital’s Emergency Department, or Walk-In Clinic.  Some patients report it to their dentist or primary care physicians. And some patients just ignore the problem and hope it will go away.

But locking of the jaw in this manner is a very bad sign that the TMD (Temporomandibular Joint Disorder) is getting much worse.

So, what is happening inside the jaw joint that is making it lock and keep the patient from opening fully?  The jaw joints, right and left sides, are composed of a ball and socket system with a cushion of cartilage as a spacer between the ball and the socket. As noted, inflammation within the confines of the jaw joint space creates All of the symptoms of TMD.  This inflammation, over a period of time, causes the ligaments and capsule holding the spacer cushion in proper position to become loose.  At first, when it becomes loose it only makes clicking and popping noises within the joint. But over time the cushion becomes so loose that one of the muscles attached to the cushion will pull it forward out of the joint space.  It then tends to curl up into a sort of accordion shaped mass in front of the joint and is an obstruction to the ball when the jaw is opened beyond the half way point.  Sometimes this cushion (cartilage) obstruction will return to its normal position allowing full opening and sometimes it does not return to its normal position within the joint. That is when the patient cannot open fully “permanently”.  I have placed “permanently” in quotation marks because this condition does not have to be permanent if treated in a timely fashion in a non-surgical manner.

For further information on how locking of the jaw can be treated in a non-surgical manner using the patented “Urbanek Device” go to www.drurbanek.com.

Dr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more at www.drurbanek.com 

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Why does my Jaw Joint Click and Pop?

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The temporomandibular jont (TMJ) is located directly in front of the ear.  It is composed of a ball and socket separated by a cushion about the size of a nickel made of cartilage.  It is somewhat unique in the body in that it has two separate types of motion. It has a simple rotation similar to the knee or hip, but also a translation (movement forward and backward.) This is possible because the cushion moves within the joint along with the ball portion as it moves forward and backward.  One can observe this type of motion in the mirror as you jut your jaw forward.  It is the combination of rotation and translation of the jaw that allows one to chew food.

In a healthy TMJ (TMJ is the name of the joint, not the disease. TMD, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, is the proper name for the disease,) the cushion is supposed to have a slight and silent forward and backward motion as the lower jaw opens to its full extent and then closes.  But in a diseased, inflamed TMJ the tendons which hold the cushion in place get lose and allow the cushion to move well beyond the limits of normal. The edge of the cushion then glides over the ball beneath it and a clicking sound is heard.   When the jaw is closed the ball glides over the edge of the cushion again as it fully seats in the socket and a second click or pop is heard.  This type of reciprocal clicking, (click on opening and click on closing) is one of the first signs of TMD.  Clicking is a sign of TMD and not a symptom.  Many people can go for years with a clicking sound before they begin to have symptoms. (A symptom is pain or disfunction which substantially interferes with normal activities, while a sign, although not normal, does not substantially interfere with normal activites).

But when ignored, this reciprocal clicking can turn into any, or all of the symptoms of TMD. (Headache, Earache, Jaw Pain, Neck Pain, Ringing in the Ears, A feeling of Fullness in the Ears, Vertigo, Shoulder and Arm Pain, Arm/Hand/Finger Tingling and Numbness and Locking—the inability to open the jaw fully).  All of these symptoms are directly caused by inflammation of the jaw joint.  Clicking of the joint is one of the earliest signs that you may be developing TMD.

If clicking or popping of the jaw joint is the only sign present, I will usually tell the patient to return for further consultation when some of the symptoms appear.  I have seen many people who click and pop indefinitely but never develop any of the other symptoms especially in males.  On the other hand, I have seen many many patients who think clicking and popping is their only symptom, but on further questioning have had a long history of TMD headaches, earaches, neck pain that they attribute to having migraines, sinus problems and too much bending over the computer.

Clicking and popping of the TMJ is just a sign of impending problems.  But if you have any of the other symptoms, a simple 30 second diagnostic test can rule in or out the existence of active temporomandibular joint disease.

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more at www.drurbanek.com 

Symptoms of TMJ/TMD : Why are there so many dissimilar symptoms?

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The answer to this question resides in one simple fact.  All of the symptoms of TMD (temporomandibular joint disorder) are directly caused by inflammation within the TMJ (temporomandibular joint).  The issue of why the joint becomes inflamed is a different issue and will be discussed in a later contribution to this site.  But the fact remains, that all of the different, varied, and apparently unrelated symptoms associated with TMD are derived directly from inflammation within the TMJ.  This, in part, explains why TMD is so often misdiagnosed as something other that what it is.  Most commonly, TMD is misdiagnosed as migraine headaches or orthopedic problems of the neck.

Inflammation is the generic term which describes the bodies response to damage whose main purpose is to begin and carry forward the healing process.  Whether you cut your finger, break a leg, burn your hand, sustain a coronary artery occlusion (heart attack), or develop TMD, inflammation is the common denominator at the site of damage.  Science has now demonstrated, there are many things we know about inflammation and there are still many things still to be discovered.

One of the more recent discoveries is that besides initiating a cascade of chemical, cellular and humeral events at the site of damage, inflammation initiates a sequence of neural transmissions back to the central nervous system (brain) which trigger neural, muscular and even hormonal changes which help the body deal with the injury at hand.  Inflammation of any joint can be shown to have local effects and systemic effects, (effects that effect systems of the body) distant from the site of injury.  This is nowhere more evident than in the symptoms associated with TMD.

Let’s break down inflammation of the TMJ into its local effects and systemic effects.  Any textbook of pathology will list with florid Latin description the five characteristics of inflammation: 1. Tumor (swelling), 2. Rubor (redness), 3. Calor (increased temperature), 4. Dolor (pain), and 5. Functio Laesa (disfunction).  These characteristics explain the local effects of inflammation on the TMJ.  Patients will point directly at the joint and comment on the swelling, redness, temperature, pain and limitation of motion.  But these localized symptoms are only most likely to show up in a severely damaged TMJ that has been neglected for a long time. It is actually the systemic symptoms, mediated by nerve signals from the joint, which are usually the first signs that the joint is diseased and inflamed.  Inflammation triggers the autonomic nerves in the area to signal the brain that the joint is damaged.  The brain in turn signals the body not to move that damaged joint.  The brain signals the muscles that move the joint to go stiff and not move the joint.  This is called muscle trismus.  So the five large muscles around the jaw joint get stiff and tight and pull on the bone where they are attached.  The pain will be felt where these muscles are attached to the bone mainly on the head, (headache).  This is why headache is the most common symptom of TMD.  If, after a while, the joint remains damaged and continues to send signals to the brain that the damage persists, the central nervous system, in its wisdom, send out a signal to splint or hold still the entire head in an attempt to decrease the inflammation in the offending TMJ.  This is when the patient begins complaining of pain of the neck and upper back where the neck muscles are attached.  Neck pain is the second most common symptom of TMD.  If the TMJ is not treated to decrease the inflammation after these symptoms show up, the brain continues to receive the signals of inflammation within the joint and finally sends out a reflex response to tighten or hold still the entire upper shoulder area.  This is when the patient will complain of pain or tightening of the shoulder and/or arm and once these muscles squeeze the brachial plexus of the arm, complain of arm/hand/ and finger tingling and numbness.  Wow! Could anything be more wiered that having tingling in the fingers and hand caused directly from inflammation of the jaw joint…  There have even been documented cases of patients thinking they were having a heart attack because the pain of the left shoulder, caused from TMJ inflammation, was so intense.

Ringing in the ears, (tinnitus) fullness in the ears (a feeling like you have been swimming and can’t clear your ears, or a sensation that you cannot hear as well), and dizziness (vertigo) are also common symptoms of TMD.  The explanation for these symptoms will be given at another post.

Disorders of the temporomandibular joint have been found to be very common, affecting 45% of females between the ages of 13 and 75.  It is seen almost exclusively in females, 95% females, 5% males, and almost exclusively in people who are highly motivated or highly stressed.

98% of patients in my practice are treated successfully with a non-surgical intra oral device and treatment protocol.  To date over 2000 patients have been successfully treated.

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more at www.drurbanek.com 

Is it a really a Migraine Headache? The Answer May Surprise You

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Headaches are so common most people think that having headaches is a normal part of living.  “Doesn’t everybody have headaches?”  No! Headaches are not normal and not everyone has headaches.  But they are so common millions of advertising dollars are spent each month competing for the public to buy their pain relieving pill instead of their competitors.  And thanks to this never ending onslaught of pain reliever ads, just about everyone thinks they have migraine headaches.  Instead of looking for the causes of pain, they promote,  “take our pill for your migraine.”

So, what’s really going on other than the drug companies want you to buy their product.

First of all, migraine headaches are very rare.  But the associated symptoms of a true migraine are very specific.  Sixty percent of people with migraine headaches state they get a feeling that the pain is about to begin before it actually starts.  These unusual feelings can include altered mood, irritability, depression or euphoria, fatigue, craving for certain foods, stiff muscles, especially in the neck, constipation or diarrhea and sensitivity to smells or noise. Additionally, people with migraines complain of visual disturbances associated with the headache like moving spots in their visual field or extreme intolerance to light.  This is the aura phase of the true migraine headaches and it is said to occur in 99% of cases.  These visual disturbances consist of a partial alteration in the field of vision flickers and may interfere with the person’s ability to read or function visually. Some patients lose parts of their field of vision and can see only part of what is in front of them.  Other common sensory symptoms with a true migraine headache are a feeling of pins and needles on one side in the hand and spreads to the nose and mouth area of the same side.  Numbness in the affected area will occur after the pins and needle feeling has passed.

The pain of a true migraine headache can be quite severe and last from one hour to several days.  Nausea occurs concurrently in almost all cases of migraine headache with about one third of the patients actually vomiting.

The cause for Migraine Headaches is unknown.

The symptoms associated with TMD (Temporomandibular Joint Disorders) on the other hand are very specific, but admittedly similar to some of the symptoms of true migraine headaches.  The symptoms of TMD are:

  1. Frequent of recurrent headaches with the associated pain always being located where the muscles of mastication are attached to the bone of the face and skull.
  2. Frequent or recurrent earaches. This can be unilateral or bilateral and frequently described by patients as a “deep earache”.
  3. Neck pain that occurs where the muscles that control head movement are connected to the skull and upper torso.
  4. Pain in the mandible, (jaw). This pain can radiate from above and is frequently confused with dental pain.  Many patients have actually had teeth extracted thinking that the pain was coming from the teeth.
  5. Tinnitus (ringing in the ear)
  6. Hearing problems frequently described and a feeling of fullness in the ear or talking inside of a drum
  7. Vertigo
  8. Shoulder or arm pain or tightness
  9. Arm/hand/finger tingling or numbness
  10. Inability to open the lower jaw fully or locking of the jaw

Many people who experience unexplained headaches, earaches, neck pain, jaw pain, vertigo or shoulder/arm pain do not realize that these symptoms are due to the inflammation in their JAW JOINT resulting in Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

If you think your pain may be associated with TMJ Disorder, call my office today at 615-771-1983 to schedule a consultation in Franklin or Memphis, TN.

By Dr.Tony Urbanek

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years.

He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal.

 

Temprormandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) has been misunderstood, poorly researched, and poorly treated by many

iStock_000045395372_XXXLargeAfter working with patients with TMD for over 30 years I have been impressed with the multifaceted aspects of this disease.  After getting into communication with thousands of people suffering from the symptoms of TMD I have concluded that,

1) No two patients present with exactly the same symptoms.

2) By the time most people get in my office to see me, they are desperate for relief.

3) These patients have already seen multiple practitioners and tried multiple modalities of treatment without positive results.

4) Most practitioners, (physicians, surgeons, dentists, chiropractors, physical therapists, massage therapists), have given up on finding a reliable and reproducible solution for TMD

5) Insurance companies, taking their lead from the practitioners, have also come to the point of view that nothing really works in treating TMD,

6) There is an overabundance of research papers, book chapters, books, professional journals, and meetings/conferences/conventions dedicated to discussing, writing about, sharing opinions and findings, and teaching about TMD

7)  Everyone seems to agree on only one point, ” No one seems to know how to fix TMD”.

That was my point of view a few years ago.  But as a scientist and researcher (M.S. Anatomy, PH’D student in cell biology, and Research Fellow with the NIH running my own research project for 2 years) I decided not to give up on finding a solution to the enigma of TMD.

I had already tried all the standard methods of finding a solution including reading all the books/journals/book chapters/clinics, and attending the meetings/conferences/conventions.  But I believe there is always a solution to every problem.

When a problem seems unsolvable, I have found that I was looking for the solution in the wrong place.  So I decided to quit looking for the solution in all the places everyone else was looking and decided to start my research from scratch, and do something that was quite unique. That is: To get into communication with my PATIENTS regarding the problem and gather as much basic information as possible in order to understand the problem best.  And much to my surprise, it was my patients who immediately told me about the key to the solution.

After interviewing dozens of patients with TMD, one point stood out clearly.  Patients told me if they separated their posterior teeth, (back teeth) for a long enough period of time, they found relief.  WOW!! Could it possibly be that simple!!

So, I starting making a device of my own design that would keep the posterior teeth separated without interfering with jaw movement and devised a protocol for its use. Almost magically patients I treated with the device returned in a short time saying that they were 70%, 80%, 90% 100% better after 10,20.30 years of pain.  I was factually stunned by the results.  After a couple of dozen patients, I knew the device worked, but I had no idea why it was so effective.  And as Paul Harvey used to say: “And now for the rest of the story!”.  But that story is too long to go into here at this time.  Needless to say, I did work out using research protocols the scientific facts behind the device effectiveness.  Last year I did 41 lectures to other professionals explaining these scientific findings.  And I will be happy to explain to anyone who is willing to listen how and why the device is so effective.  But the science behind the device is very simple and well documented in the literature.  It really was just a matter of connecting the dots in order to get the full explanation.

Most other people out there are looking for the solution in the wrong place.  The whole pathologic sequence starts in the joint itself and has everything to do with INFLAMMATION of the disc or cushion within the joint.  Once that fact is fully understood, the remaining data flows easily.

That is not to say there is not a lot of additional research needing to be done regarding the enigma of TMD.  There are lots of questions that remain unanswered, but how to make the symptoms go away is not one of them.  But one first has to understand where and why the problem originates.

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years.
He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal .

Learn more at www.drurbanek.com 

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, Recessed Jaw and Breathing Problems Success Story

BillBill Matseas suffered from pain and soreness in his TMJ, or Temporomandibular Joint, had a recessed jaw, and suffered from breathing problems. That is, until he sought treatment from Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Dr. Anthony Urbanek, a Board Certified specialist with more than 30 years of experience treating TMJ problems and Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD).

Matseas underwent surgery and is now breathing easy, without pain, thanks to Dr. Urbanek. “He explained the surgery thoroughly,” says Matseas. “He’s meticulous.”

“I would not trust anyone else in the world to do this other than Dr. Urbanek.  He’s a master at what he does,” adds Matseas.

Dr. Urbanek has performed approximately 2,000 surgeries throughout his career. Temporomandibular Joint problems, which are disorders related to your complex jaw joint, develop for a variety of reasons, and not every person suffering from TMJ requires surgery. Early detection, however, is important because some types of TMJ problems can lead to more serious conditions.

Matseas says he felt comfortable throughout the surgery process, and in post-op. “Dr. Urbanek’s got a good office staff — very friendly and welcoming. It’s almost not like going to a doctor’s office,” he notes.

Matseas says he’s not only is he feeling better physically, but also that his “Greek profile” as he calls it, has really improved. “I’m complimented all the time on it,” he says happily.

Unable to chew after his surgery, Matseas enjoyed Dr. Urbanek’s smoothie recipe, and even improved upon it, recalling with a chuckle, “They were so good, I couldn’t stop drinking them.”

Matseas says he was very pleased with the results from his surgery. “Dr. Urbanek is the only person I would see for anything regarding my jaw. He’s in a league by himself.”

TMJ Splint Patient Feature-Vicki

Vicki Holton  had TMJ pain for several months and before that, many years of headaches, ear ringing, etc. that was always misdiagnosed as sinus/allergy problems.
TMJ Splint Franklin TNAfter exhausting many different alternative treatments, her dentist recommended that she see a specialist in TMJ. I diagnosed the TMJ and fit her with my TMJ Splint.
Vicki said, “It has truly been a life saver! Almost immediately no more pain. By the second day of wearing the splint, my symptoms had gone away! I am so grateful for such an easy solution to my pain. Thank you Dr. Urbanek!!”

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more atwww.drurbanek.com 

How Expensive are Dental Implants?

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The most common perception shared by just about everyone is that dental implants are EXPENSIVE!!!.  Well it is true that the newest technology is sometimes more expensive than older technology.

But the question should be:

“ Are dental implants expensive when compared to older technology?”

Or another question should be:

“Do dental implants provide such superior results to the problem of missing teeth that there is no comparison between the VALUE of the new technology in comparison to the old technology.”

Let me give you a few examples. The first and  most frequently lost teeth in an otherwise healthy mouth are the first molars. These are the big, wide teeth in the middle of the back teeth.  In order to replace this tooth the dentist can use the old technology which is a three unit bridge.  This technology consists of cutting down the teeth behind and in front of the missing tooth into little pegs and making three artificial crowns and which connect them all together to make a solid bridge.

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The average charge of this service in Middle Tennessee is $1,500 per crown or $4,500 for the bridge.  The newer technology of replacing the tooth with a dental implant consists of placing the implant surgically into the bone and attaching a crown to the implant once it has fully healed.  The average charge for a single dental implant in Middle Tennessee is $2,500.  Add the cost of the crown, $1,500, and the total for a single dental implant is $4,000. Five hundred dollars less than the three unit bridge.
And it is a much better service because two adjacent teeth do not have to be cut down into little pegs leaving these teeth open to further problems with dental decay around the margins of the crowns that cover the pegs.

Another example is the use of dental implants to anchor cull dentures. Again, most people are familiar with the concept of full dentures thanks to the never ending TV commercials for denture adhesive.  Did you ever wonder why there is such a big market for denture adhesives that companies can spend millions of dollars advertising their products on TV?  The answer is conventional dentures are very difficult to chew with because they have nothing to anchor them in place.  They slip and slide around when eating if the owner can eat with them at all.  Most people with upper and lower dentures only wear their upper denture because the lower denture is so uncomfortable.  They “wear” the lower denture in their pocket or in the drawer next to the bed.

IMP Dentures

By survey, 95% of people with dentures do not wear the lower denture.  On the other hand the newer technology of anchoring dentures with dental implants allows the denture to be attached to these anchors and the patient is able to eat and function comfortably as when they had natural teeth.  They do not have to take their teeth in and out.  They are anchored permanently.  The average charge of an upper and lower denture in Middle Tennessee implantdiagramis $3,000, $1,500 per denture.  The average charge for upper and lower implant anchored dentures in Middle Tennessee is $30,000, $15,000 per denture.

That’s a lot of money for sure.

But the question is, “What is the VALUE of being able to eat whatever you want as if you had your natural teeth again?”  “What is the VALUE of not having to take your denture in and out of your mouth constantly to apply the “goop” that tries to hold it in place?”  “What is the value of not being embarrassed by others knowing that you have to wear dentures?”

So, while dental implants may be more expensive than other options, I am sure you can agree that they are much more valuable to you.

Dr. Tony

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical, patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more atwww.drurbanek.com 

How Long Does it Take to Get a Dental Implant?

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By now just about everyone has heard about “dental implants”.  Thanks to television commercials, we are constantly presented with the idea that we could have “new teeth in a day”.   But this simply is not the case for most, and I am going to share with you the real truth here.

The truth is that is takes time to properly reconstruct missing teeth.  Sure, it would be nice if getting a dental implant were as fast as uploading a selfie of your new smile! But, only a very small percentage of people meet the criteria for having same day teeth. Those criteria include being totally without teeth or needing all your teeth removed. Even then, the denture provided is temporary and will eventually have to be replaced by a more permanent prosthesis in about 6 months.

The truth is BONE HEALS SLOWLY.  Just ask someone with a broken arm.  The same applies to the jaws.  It is possible under some circumstances to place a dental implant and attach a temporary crown or temporary denture attached to multiple implants, but most of the time it is more prudent to allow the bone to completely heal and adhere to the implant before it is loaded with a functional dental appliance.

Too many times, in haste to complete treatment,  the implant is loaded with pressure before it is completely healed and the implant fails to heal in the bone.  When that occurs the process has to start over from scratch including letting the bone heal properly, and possibly additional bone grafting, before the replacement implant can be surgically placed again.

Therefore, in most cases the implant reconstruction is more predictable with fewer complications when the bone is allowed to heal properly before attaching the crowns or dentures.

So how long does it take to complete the dental implant procedure? Generally, it is best to allow the implants to heal for 4 months before they are “loaded” and the denture is made that is attached to the implants.  Again, some modifications to the technique can be made to have a denture attached immediately, but may cause implant failure.

Like most things worth waiting for, proper dental implants cannot always be created overnight. Be patient to allow your Doctor the necessary time to create your new, beautiful smile.

Dr. Tony

11892096_969100833131355_8374033213629088074_nDr. Anthony P. Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgical, patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more at www.drurbanek.com 

TMJ Splint Patient Feature-Penny

TMJ Splint Franklin TNPenny suffered from pain in her jaw for almost three years. Her dentist couldn’t find anything wrong, but Penny couldn’t continue putting up with the pain.
Her husband, who was a previous patient of mine and was very happy with his results, told her to call me.
Penny came in to see me for consultation and I began treating her for TMJ Disorder with my patented, non-surgical TMJ Splint.
According to Penny, she is now 100% pain free using her TMJ Splint!
This is what Penny had to say about her experience in our office:
“Everyone in the office is super nice and helpful. Thank you Dr. Urbanek for listening to your patients and coming up with this treatment. Pain Free!!”
-Penny McCormick
Thank you Penny for trusting us to help you.
Dr. Tony
Dr. Tony Urbanek is a double degree Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Dr. Urbanek received his dental degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Urbanek is board certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and has served Williamson and Davidson counties for over 30 years. He currently specializes in treating TMJ/TMD with his non-surgecial, patented TMJ splint and is also a specialist in Dental Implants and Wisdom Teeth Removal . Learn more at www.drurbanek.com